olds
Thank you, Michael,
Sun Sep 04, 16:19

both for the interview and for providing a heads-up about the book which for anyone interested in the subject sounds like a must-read. Apparently it's been available for a couple months now, but I had no idea.

Good podcast. I only wish that you had asked James about his opinion of Michael Ondaatje's "The Collected Works of Billy the Kid," a volume, however slim, that is part of my personal "canon."

I have to say that James's remark about the "Live Fast, Die Young & Leave a Good-looking Corpse" through-line from Bonney to James Dean to Kobain strikes me as spot-on. It is true enough that there were others whose fact-based Old West profile, so to say, far outstrips Mr. McCarty's, but there can be no question that his is among the most mythologically iconic, just as Dean's and Cobain's similarly are in their respective fields of endeavor and for much the same reason.

It sounds like James's book has broken new ground, especially with respect to the "Hispanic angle," and I cannot wait to read it for that reason if no other. And he is correct, 700+ pages is not all that intimidating. That said, the University of North Texas Press is to be commended for its willingness to publish a volume of that length, especially these days.

James remarked that his interest in the Kid began with the 1990 film "Young Guns II," some 32 years ago now. I believe that I may eclipse him on that score as my own began with the recently deceased Clu Gulager's (what a terrific name!) portrayal of the Kid in the 1960 TV series "The Tall Man." But then, I am old, not old enough to have been around for the 1926 publication of Walter Noble Burn's "Saga," perhaps, but plenty old enough all the same.

Again, thanks for the posting. Greatly appreciated.

  • Billy The KidMike Mayberry, Sat Sep 03 21:49
    My latest podcast with James B. Mills about his new book, Billy the Kid is on ITunes now. Tap on the link to listen. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/james-b-mills-his-story/id1392269011?i=1... more
    • PodcastEddie Lanham, Tue Sep 06 15:31
      Mike, Very very good impressive interview with James Mills. Glad he dug deep into the San Patricio connection. I like his speaking style! Most Podcasts hold my attention for about 5-10 min, I may listen... more
    • Thank you, Michael, — olds, Sun Sep 04 16:19
      • Should have notedolds, Sun Sep 04 18:11
        that Dean, ironically, was to play the Kid in the 1958 film "The Left-handed Gun," but was killed in a car crash prior to filming and was replaced by Paul Newman. He, Dean, also was slated to play Rocky... more
        • Re: Should have notedDaniel Buck, Sun Sep 04 19:56
          Different, definitely yes, but better, probably not since it's more of a comedy than a drama. Anyway, as I recall William Goldman was hung on Newman as Cassidy. As for really different, when Steve... more
          • There's no gainsayingolds, Mon Sep 05 9:31
            that Newman and Redford shared a combustible "chemistry" that sparked on screen, both in "Butch Cassidy" and "The Sting." There was a kind of spontaneous back-and-forth energy between them that seemed... more
            • Re: There's no gainsayingerik hewitt, Mon Sep 05 21:42
              Dean was in three movies. Newman had Redford. Lemon had Matthau. Brando was Brando. Dean had Sal Mineo. Hardly a Jack Nicholson.
            • Lemmon's one & onlyJerry Prather, Mon Sep 05 11:21
              Howdy olds, I saw the movie COWBOY in my local theater when it first came out. I think this was Jack Lemmon's only big screen Western(thankfully). I totally enjoyed it in 1958, but when I have tried to... more
              • You can addolds, Mon Sep 05 16:09
                me to the list of those who have not seen Vidal's 1955 "The Death of Billy the Kid." Wonder what if any is the connection there to the 1989 Val Kilmer Kid TV film, also written by Vidal. I have seen... more
              • ps: Three GravesJerry Prather, Mon Sep 05 13:44
                Just watched the Zane Grey Theatre episode "Three Graves". Jack Lemmon rides into a town where no guns are allowed. He concocts a scheme to take over the town and gain the riches he assumes will follow.... more
                • Here's JackJerry Prather, Tue Sep 06 6:12
                  I found that this has recently been added on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrOJPxQStsY
                  • Geej whiz, Jerryolds, Tue Sep 06 14:04
                    Imagine my disappointment when I clicked on your post entitled "Here's Jack" only to discover that the Jack you were referring to was Lemmon. (Yes, I know, that that was the subject at hand.) For me, as... more
                    • A musical interlude for JackJerry Prather, Wed Sep 07 6:44
                      Bruce, I didn't recognize the name Colin Hay, but Men At Work certainly rang a bell. Had not heard the song for quite a while. It and several others from them are great. So, here's "Looking For Jack":... more
                    • Will the real Jack please stand upJerry Prather, Tue Sep 06 14:49
                      Well, the real Jack actually was in the back of my mind when I wrote that. How could he not be? With inappropriate casting being discussed, how horrible would it have been if after that axe chopped the... more
                • Yes, andolds, Mon Sep 05 16:12
                  Lee Remick and Shirley McLaine. (By the way, my mis-spelling of Lemmon in the prior post was inadvertent. No aspersion cast.)
            • Re: There's no gainsayingDaniel Buck, Mon Sep 05 9:46
              Goldman's most well known advice, about Hollywood, was “Nobody knows anything...... Not one person in the entire motion picture field knows for a certainty what's going to work. Every time out it's a guess... more
              • Well, Altman'solds, Mon Sep 05 16:45
                correct. Whether film or book or painting or musical composition, you as the maker have no way of knowing in advance if what you are making is going to "click," even less so if it is going to "stick."... more